Paul Killoren PT, DPT

  1. Sarcastic Anatomy - Psoas

    Sarcastic Anatomy - Psoas

    Frustrating 6th grade spelling bee participants for decades, the psassy little psoas doesn’t like to pronounce his P’s. Pso dumb. Editor’s note: I seriously considered writing this entire blog with a silent ‘P’ in front of every word starting with an ‘S’, but that one sentence up top already annoy
  2. Sarcastic Anatomy – Latissimus Dorsi

    Sarcastic Anatomy – Latissimus Dorsi

    This edition of Sarcastic Anatomy from iDryNeedle focuses on the good, the bad, and the ugly involving the latissimus dorsi.  This muscle is imperative to global stability and function, and worth knowing more about whether you are a dry needling clinician or fitness newbie. 
  3. Sarcastic Anatomy - Multifidus

    Sarcastic Anatomy - Multifidus

    Don't take this too seriously. Our own Paul Killoren PT, DPT gives you everything you need to know about multifidus, including his personal appraisal.  He was overheard muttering, "I'm just saying what everyone else is thinking about multifidus."
  4. 5 Ways Dry Needling Is Being Used ...including 4 you may not know about!

    5 Ways Dry Needling Is Being Used ...including 4 you may not know about!

    Paul Killoren, PT, DPT goes into 5 applications of dry needling, many of them you may not have considered before.  See research and rationale for dry needling acute injuries, spasticity, pre-competition for muscle function, post-competition for recovery, and for pain relief in general. 
  5. Four Reasons Dry Needling Is About To Explode

    Four Reasons Dry Needling Is About To Explode

    It’s interesting to think that dry needling, a technique developed in the 1980’s, remains in its infancy. Even with top hierarchical research on safety and effectiveness, widespread acceptance worldwide and (almost) entirely in the US, use by every major sports league and our military, and recognition by DPT programs – dry needling is in diapers. Estimations have been made that <3% of physical therapists in the US are currently practicing dry needling and the number of emails, calls and conve
  6. Evidence-Based Practice: the WHAT Brain vs the WHY Brain

    Evidence-Based Practice: the WHAT Brain vs the WHY Brain

    The Evidence-Based Practice Debate – the WHAT brain and the WHY brain. In physical therapy (and likely all medicine), I can’t think of anything more agreeable, yet aggressively confrontational than the Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) conversation. The term and principles – completely agreeable. But applying it to treatment X, Y, Z – utterly polarizing. Initially, these affable professional conversations morph into uncompromising rhetoric, ultimately polarizing a topic
  7. JOURNAL CLUB - Spinal and peripheral dry needling versus peripheral dry needling alone among individuals with a history of lateral ankle sprain : a randomized controlled trial

    JOURNAL CLUB - Spinal and peripheral dry needling versus peripheral dry needling alone among individuals with a history of lateral ankle sprain : a randomized controlled trial

    Check out the full text for this December 2017 IJSPT clinical trial here- https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC57174..
  8. Dry Needling Clinical Commentary: "Should I use dry needling before or after other manual techniques?"

    Dry Needling Clinical Commentary: "Should I use dry needling before or after other manual techniques?"

    “Should I use dry needling before or after other manual techniques?” A good question – and one we get on courses all the time. “Should I use dry needling before or after other manual techniques?” I’ll defuse the potential e-bomb right now and say this is clearly an “it depends” answer. It depends on a lot actually…diagnosis, condition chronicity, severity, complexity, your treatment model, your expertise – but l
  9. Journal Club: Comparison of Dry Needling vs. Sham on the Performance of Vertical Jump

    Journal Club: Comparison of Dry Needling vs. Sham on the Performance of Vertical Jump

    Check out this October 2017 dry
  10. EFFECTS OF DRY NEEDLING (DNHS TECHNIQUE) ON THE CONTRACTILE PROPERTIES OF SPASTIC MUSCLES IN A PATIENT WITH STROKE: A CASE REPORT

    EFFECTS OF DRY NEEDLING (DNHS TECHNIQUE) ON THE CONTRACTILE PROPERTIES OF SPASTIC MUSCLES IN A PATIENT WITH STROKE: A CASE REPORT

    - Free full text available here -  Calvo, S., Quintero, I., & Herrero, P. (2016). Effects of dry needling (DNHS technique) on the contractile properties of spastic muscles in a patient with stroke: a case report. International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, 39(4), 372-376. The Patient -Male
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